Family Building

    • The National Cancer Institute estimates that each year nearly one-quarter (133,000) of all new cancer diagnoses will impact women AND men of reproductive age.
    • Only 50% of adolescents and young adults diagnosed with cancer are told that cancer treatments can cause infertility.


      • Cancer patients have a very short window to decide to preserve fertility prior to treatment or in between surgery and chemotherapy.
      • That’s why we are talking about this issue so you know what to ask your providers when you see them again.


      • Because cost is a major barrier. Nearly 33% of male and 20% of female cancer patients diagnosed between 15 and 39 years of age identify cost as the primary reason for not arranging for fertility preservation prior to treatment.


      • Male preservation costs up to $700 for analysis and up to $400 annually for storage.
      • Female fertility preservation can cost a minimum of $15,000…this does not include future cost of implantation.
      • But don’t worry there are several resources that will help:


      • Not so fast. A cancer diagnosis bars Americans from adopting internationally.
      • In the United states, one adoption agency could require additional costly medical exams while another may require the survivor to remain cancer free for a number of years (varies by the state).
      • Not to forget to mention… adoption can cost on average $20,000-$30,000 and there is no federal refund to assist with adoption.


      • Adolescent and young adult cancer survivors are 1.5 times more likely than women of a similar age without a cancer history, to deliver before full gestation or an underweight child.
      • Also, they are also more likely to undergo cesarean sections.
      • Unfortunately NCI only tracks mortality and secondary cancers. We don’t completely know the long term effects of any cancer treatment including to your fertility and ability to naturally have a child.


      • Require payors that provide fertility benefits to extend coverage to patients before cancer treatment begins and not upon a diagnosis of infertility;
      • Ensure patients are charged the same fees for fertility service;
      • Create a federal adoption tax refund available for all Americans pursuing adoption and set guidelines for access to alternatives to fertility preservation; and
      • Support research to better understand the long-term treatment effects experienced by 15-39 year olds diagnosed with cancer including but not limited to family building.


Sample Messages (Tweets/Facebook):

@theNCI estimates each year 133,000 of all new cancer diagnoses will impact women AND men of reproductive age #AYAFamilyClick To Tweet

Only 50% of adolescents and young adults diagnosed w/ cancer are told by doctors that their treatments can cause infertility #AYAFamilyClick To Tweet

33% of male & 20% of female AYA cancer patients say fertility preservation cost is reason for not doing it prior to treatment #AYAFamilyClick To Tweet

Male fertility preservation costs up to $700 for analysis and up to $400 annually for storage #AYAFamilyClick To Tweet

Female fertility preservation can cost a minimum of $15,000…this does not include future cost of implantation #AYAFamilyClick To Tweet

A cancer diagnosis bars Americans from adopting internationally #AYAFamilyClick To Tweet

AYA cancer survivors are 1.5X more likely than those of similar age w/o cancer history to deliver an underweight child #AYAFamilyClick To Tweet

Sharable Graphics

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